Dr. Suprashant Kulkarni

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, FICS - General Surgery General Surgeon, Laparoscopic Surgeon

Home Varicose Veins

Varicose Veins

  • Varicose veins are large, swollen veins that often appear on the legs and feet. They happen when the valves in the veins do not work properly, so the blood does not flow effectively.
  • The veins rarely need treatment for health reasons, but if swelling, aching, and painful legs result, and if there is considerable discomfort, treatment is available.
  • There are various options, including some home remedies.
  • In severe cases, a varicose vein may rupture, or develop into varicose ulcers on the skin. These will require treatment.

Symptoms

  Varicose veins may not cause any pain. Signs you may have varicose veins include:
  • Veins that are dark purple or blue in color
  • Veins that appear twisted and bulging; they are often like cords on your legs
When painful signs and symptoms occur, they may include:
  • An achy or heavy feeling in your legs
  • Burning, throbbing, muscle cramping and swelling in your lower legs
  • Worsened pain after sitting or standing for a long time
  • Itching around one or more of your veins
  • Skin discoloration around a varicose vein

Risk factors

These factors increase your risk of developing varicose veins:
  • Age. The risk of varicose veins increases with age. Aging causes wear and tear on the valves in your veins that help regulate blood flow. Eventually, that wear causes the valves to allow some blood to flow back into your veins where it collects instead of flowing up to your heart.
  • Sex. Women are more likely to develop the condition. Hormonal changes during pregnancy, premenstruation or menopause may be a factor because female hormones tend to relax vein walls. Hormone treatments, such as birth control pills, may increase your risk of varicose veins.
  • Pregnancy. During pregnancy, the volume of blood in your body increases. This change supports the growing fetus, but also can produce an unfortunate side effect — enlarged veins in your legs. Hormonal changes during pregnancy may also play a role.
  • Family history. If other family members had varicose veins, there’s a greater chance you will too.
  • Obesity. Being overweight puts added pressure on your veins.
  • Standing or sitting for long periods of time. Your blood doesn’t flow as well if you’re in the same position for long periods.

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